Aug 11 2020

Insects galore on our Kent estate

We wanted to share some excellent photos of insects that some of our fabulous wildlife monitor volunteers have shared with us over the past month. These are all taken in our Kent woods.

Clouded Yellows mating at Hucking Estate, near

Clouded Yellows mating at Hucking Estate, near Maidstone – taken by Alan Stubbs, wildlife monitor volunteer

A migratory European butterfly and a regular visitor to Britain and Ireland. Usually found on sources of clover, the Clouded Yellow is one of the few butterfly species that have no difficulty locating breeding habitat in the modern farmed countryside. In southern England, they have a preference for unimproved chalk downland.

 

Orange-tailed clearwing at Hucking Estate, near Maidstone

Orange-tailed clearwing at Hucking Estate, near Maidstone. Taken by Alan Stubbs, wildlife monitor volunteer

A moth with two distinct yellow bands on the abdomen. This species occurs in central southern England, on chalk downland, preferring the edges of woodland.

 

Four spotted leaf beetle at Victory Wood, near Whitstable

Four spotted leaf beetle at Victory Wood, near Whitstable. Taken by John Dale, wildlife monitor volunteer.

Adults feed on new shoots and leaves of trees and shrubs; larvae feed on plant debris within ant nests.

 

Silver-washed fritillary taken at Park Wood near Canterbury

Silver-washed fritillary taken at Park Wood near Canterbury. Taken by Claire Inglis Assistant Site Manager

These butterflies live in oak woodland or woodlands with sunny rides and glades. Their population declined during the 20th century, but is now stable after big spikes in recent years. It is, however, still considered a species of conservation concern.

 

Common carder bee at Park Wood

Common carder bee at Park Wood. Taken by Tim Hewke, warden and wildlife monitor volunteer

Carder Bumblebees nest in long grass or in underground. They are so named after the way they create their nests on the surface of the ground, often in grassy tussocks. They comb or ‘card’ together material such as grass and moss to build a cover for their nest.

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